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Beverly Hills, California
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July 28, 2011     Beverly Hills Weekly
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July 28, 2011
 

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-A b~-iel~. ~cewm~ briefs, r~wewe~ tald~ cole ! WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND? You can write us at:. 140 South Beverly Drive #201 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 You can fax US at: 310,887.0789 email us at: editor@bhweekly.com SNAPSHOT Reflecting on a City career It was a little over a year ago that I retired from service with the City of Beverly Hills. I thought I would take a fond look back at a community that so enriched my life during my nearly 29 years of service there. In so many ways, Beverly Hills epitomizes small-town America, where everyone seems to know each other. Its reputation for excellence grew out of a time when its businesses and residents forged relationships, personal relationships in which they could count on one another. In my day, City Hall also followed that Beverly Hills shop model to some degree, where role of the store owner was as much about a personal commitment to the cus- tomers' needs as it was about managing the store's bottom line. I thought of my role with the Planning Department as akin to that shopkeeper, and I felt I belonged to the community and that shepherding its well-being was my duty. Part of that perspective came from working with pub- lic servants who weren't employees, but citizens of the community, from Donna Ellman Garber and Max Salter, to Meralee Goldman and Kathy Reims, among many other exceptional public citizens. What made working for Beverly Hills rewarding to me and many colleagues was just mak- ing a difference to something meaningful to us. I think Mark Scott served the com- munity on a much smaller salary than is more commonly seen for city managers today, as exemplified by the likes of the Cities of Bell and Vernon, because I think his motivation wasn't so much a lure of extravagance as it was caring about what he did and about accomplishing what things the "community needed, But the Beverly Hills shop model doesn't have the efftciencies of today's co rl~rate model. Today, customer service means talking to a machine or to someone halfway around the globe. The value of work has been eclipsed by the marketplace of "talent" and the relentless drive for profit, and there are days when I ask myself if our society is all that much better served through efficien- cies. I suppose the realities of today make me romanticize over a bygone era. But I hope Beverly Hills never loses those quali- ties that made it special. Larry Sakurai Los Angeles "Planning Commission concerned about proposed movie theater's height" [#616] In this week's edition of your paper I was shocked to read a news brief about a proposed new theater on Canon Drive: "It's 68 feet to the top of the roof and 78 feet to the top of rooftop restroom facili- ties" ... "the landlord was out of town and did not attend the meeting" ... (he prob- ably had to go to a bathroom and doesn't care how far he has to go to find one). I don't normally have that luxury. Herb Wallerstein Beverly Hills - Public Parking Fees As a former resident of Beverly Hills in the early 1970s I wish to comment on the matter of parking fees at public struc- tures. My wife and I recently parked at a public structure on Bedford Drive at 4:50 p.m. for a doctor's appointment. We then purchased various items, enjoyed Rodeo Drive, and had dinner at one of the many fine restaurants in your lovely city. During dinner we commented on how empty the restaurant was, how quiet the streets were, and how many "for rent" signs we saw on retail stores. When we returned to our car at 7:10 p.m. we paid $18 for the approximately 3.5 hours we parked. We are fortunate to live quite comfortably, but we are not fools. It will be a cold day in hell before we decide to "spotshire" again in your city. Now we know why things are not going well for business owners, professionals, and others in the City of. Beverly Hills. Ted Goldman Santa Monica A 5POONFCtL OF 5UGAP. LOMA VlSTA DPJVP.. Dick Van Dyke-(left], who played I?,ert in the original/t4ary Poppins movie, visffed Catskills West Theatre Arts Camp at Greystone Mansion on July 2!. Br'rlhley Moalemzadeh (right) {)laved the rifle character in the- camp'5 production ary Poppins. Page 2 Beverly Hills Weekly " Issue 617 -.July 28 - August 3, 2011 Beverly Hills Weekly inc. Founded: October 7, 1999 Published Thursdays Delivered in Beverly Hillsl Beverlywood, Los Angeles ISSN#1528-851X wwm.bhweeldy.com Publisher & CEO Josh E. Gross Reporter Melanie Anderson Sports Editor Steven Herbert 1 year subscriptions are available, Sent via US Mail $75 payable in advance Contributing EditorRudy Cole [ Adjudk;ated as a I I newspaper of general I - Advertising RepresentalJves Icirculation for the CountyI Patricia Massachi I of Los Angeles. Case I Negin Elazari [ # BS065841 of the Los I Lena Zormagen I Angeles Superior Court, I Legal Advertising I on November 30, 2000. ] Mike Saghian Eiman Matian 140 South Beverly Drive #201 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 310.887.0788 phone 310.887.0789 fax CNPA Member editor@bhweekly.com All staff can be reached at: first name @bhweekly.com Unsolicit~ materials will not be returned. @2011 Bevedy Hills Weekly Inc. OUR DATA SPEAKS VOLUHES